CONTRIBED SHORTAGES TO RAISE PRICES THENCE PROFITS


 
    Remember when the Greenies  told you that Oil was in short supply, and that there are to many people on the planet 
 
    WORRY  WORRY  FEAR  FEAR… The DOH promised rainwater collection tanks,  and with all the  rain we have had non of it has
   been collected/stored for future use. But the desalination plant is still sucking up all that energy  that your subsidising vide your  higher power bills…..
    take a look at all the oil vide satellite……
 
     
 
   arnt you a little bit  tired of being told one thing when in fact another is the Real Truth…
  And the above is only  one of the many oil rigs around the world  that has/ is ?   leaking.
 
 DONT BELIEVE  ALL THEIR HYPE    Especially teh crap that Carbon is a pollutant,  The  ETS has been shelved and it should stay that way.
 No matter what the ex goldman sachhs employee says,…  Mr turnball…………….
 
 
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6 Responses to CONTRIBED SHORTAGES TO RAISE PRICES THENCE PROFITS

  1. Pamela says:

    What of the oil spills they have not told you! North Sea up near Greenland, I met a man from Peru who had worked in Hospitality on Oil Rig/s there – most polluted place on the planet – he was picking Citrus in Emerald Qld – he had contracted a form of Cancer& changed his environment for his health’s sake..

  2. Pamela says:

    "The DOH promised rainwater collection tanks," lol if wishes were fishes, In Rockhampton Qld Base Hospital built a New Staff Building $XX million Dollar worth, they could have built underground rainwater tanks even to waterthe Garden, but NO! State Government & Local Council require New PRIVATE dwellings to install Rainwater tanks 2X Large – new estates & old..2 FACES OF GOVERNMENT

  3. PeterBDunn says:

    http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/news/regions-mines-release-water-fitzroy-basin/1734952/
    “We know that six mines were approved to release more than 712 million litres into the Fitzroy catchment on 25 and 26 January,” Save the Reef spokeswoman Dr Libby Connors said.

    “Another 35 mines were permitted to release water without giving their volumes.

    “If they release at a similar rate it will be adding 4800 megalitres of additional water, that’s almost five billion litres into the already flooded Fitzroy River system.”

    http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/icac-seizes-on-australian-waters-link-to-obeid-family-20121216-2bhj2.html

    For a time, a director on the board of the company’s Queensland subsidiary was Santo Santoro, a former minister
    in the Howard government who resigned in disgrace for failing to properly declare his shareholdings.

    The company also employs John Wells, a spin doctor with extensive Liberal Party connections.

    For almost three years until November last year, the federal senator and former finance director of the Liberal Party,
    Arthur Sinodinos, was the chairman of Australian Water Holdings.

    Last week, Mr Sinodinos said he, too, had 5 per cent of the company as part of his role, and he has recorded a
    shareholding in the company in his parliamentary pecuniary interest register.

    But Mr Sinodinos’s name is absent from the company’s official share register filed with the Australian Securities
    and Investments Commission. Instead, Mr Sinodinos said, Mr Di Girolamo was holding the shares on his behalf.

    Asked why the shares are not publicly registered with the corporate regulator, Mr Sinodinos said: ”Because it was
    on a gentleman’s agreement.”

    He said his agreement was that the trigger for the shares to be registered in his name was ”some realisation event”.
    He also said it would not be inaccurate to say a successful PPP was one such event.

    Since 1992, the company has been paid $580 million to roll out infrastructure to new housing estates in Sydney’s
    north-west on behalf of Sydney Water Corporation.

    Mr Di Girolamo has already had a significant win since the Coalition took government in March last year.

    In January this year, his company and Sydney Water entered a new 25-year exclusive agreement to give it the
    sole right to project manage the remaining half-a-billion dollars of water infrastructure work in the north-west growth
    centre.

    A spokesman for the Premier, Barry O’Farrell, said: ”Any agreement Australian Water Holdings has with
    Sydney Water was negotiated and agreed by Sydney Water at arm’s length from government, as is appropriate.”

    Since about 2004, the company’s main goal has been to convince the state government to sell it Sydney Water’s
    activities in the north-west growth centre, though the O’Farrell government said it had not received a formal bid
    from the company.

    This would be a deal worth billions of dollars, according to a senior government source.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/icac-seizes-on-australian-waters-link-to-obeid-family-20121216-2bhj2.html#ixzz2H9wEWWkz

    http://www.measurement.gov.au/measurementsystem/Pages/MeasurementLegislation.aspx

    http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Series/F2009L03479

    http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/F2013C00022
    Division 2.2 Verification, reverification and in-service inspection

    2.28 Verifying and marking measuring instruments

    (1) If an inspector makes a verification mark on a measuring instrument that is not a glass measure, the inspector must also mark on the measuring instrument, in the approved manner, the date on which the inspector’s mark is made.

    (2) If a servicing licensee makes a verification mark on a measuring instrument that is not a glass measure, the servicing licensee must also mark on the measuring instrument, in the approved manner, the date on which the servicing licensee’s mark is made.

    (3) If an employee of a servicing licensee verifies a measuring instrument that is not a glass measure, the employee must:

    (a) make the servicing licensee’s verification mark on the measuring instrument; and

    (b) mark on the measuring instrument, in the approved manner, the date on which the servicing licensee’s mark is made; and

    (c) make a mark on the measuring instrument that will enable the servicing licensee to identify the employee who made the servicing licensee’s mark.

    2.29 Verifying and marking material measure

    (1) If a verifier makes a verification mark on a material measure that is not a glass measure, the verifier must:

    (a) if the verifier is an inspector or servicing licensee — mark on the material measure, in the approved manner, the date on which the verification mark is made; and

    (b) if the verifier is an employee of a servicing licensee — perform each of the following actions:

    (i) mark the servicing licensee’s verification mark on the material measure; and

    (ii) mark on the material measure, in the approved manner, the date on which the servicing licensee’s mark is made; and

    (iii) make a mark on the material measure that will enable the servicing licensee to identify the employee who made the servicing licensee’s mark.

    (2) However, if compliance with subregulation (1) is impracticable because of the nature, shape or size of a material measure, the requirements in subregulation (1) are taken to have been complied with if the material measure is enclosed in a sealed container that is marked in accordance with subregulation (1).
    Part 5 Miscellaneous

    5.1 Beer, spirits etc must be sold by reference to volume

    (1) For a sale of each of the following items, the item must be sold at a price determined by reference to volume:

    (a) beer;

    (b) stout;

    (c) ale;

    (d) brandy (including armagnac and cognac);

    (e) gin;

    (f) rum;

    (g) vodka;

    (h) whisky (including whiskey).

    (2) In this regulation:

    sale means retail sale.

    5.2 Sale of article at price determined by reference to measurement

    (1) Subject to subregulation (3), if an article is advertised, offered or exposed for sale at a price determined by reference to measurement, the measurement referred to in the price must be:

    (a) if the price of the article is determined by reference to mass:

    (i) 1 kilogram; or

    (ii) 1 kilogram, with another reference to a whole number of kilograms; or

    (iii) a whole number of tonnes; or

    (iv) for an item that is a precious metal — 1 gram or 1 troy ounce; or

    (b) if the price of the article is determined by reference to volume:

    (i) 1 litre; or

    (ii) 1 litre, with another reference to a whole number of litres; or

    (iii) a whole number of cubic metres; or

    (iv) for LPG — the volume of the LPG as measured by the amount in litres that the LPG occupies, or would occupy, at a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius at equilibrium vapour pressure; or

    (v) if a person advertises, offers or exposes firewood for sale at a price determined by reference to the volume of the firewood, the person must ensure that the following requirements are met:

    (A) the firewood must be stacked with as few gaps between each piece of firewood as practicable;

    (B) the volume of a stack of firewood calculated using the dimensions of the stack must be at least the volume mentioned in advertising, offering or exposing the firewood for sale; or

    (c) if the price of the article is determined by reference to linear measurement:

    (i) 1 centimetre; or

    (ii) 1 metre; or

    (iii) 1 metre, with another reference to a whole number of metres; or

    (d) if the price of the article is determined by reference to superficial measurement:

    (i) 1 square centimetre; or

    (ii) 1 square metre; or

    (iii) 1 square metre, with another reference to a whole number of square metres.

    Note 1 An example of a measurement mentioned in paragraph (a) (ii) is 1 kilogram for $10 and 3 kilograms for $25.

    Note 2 An example of a measurement mentioned in paragraph (b) (ii) is 1 litre for $10 and 3 litres for $25.

    Note 3 An example of a measurement mentioned in paragraph (c) (iii) is 1 metre for $10 and 3 metres for $25.

    Note 4 An example of a measurement mentioned in paragraph (d) (iii) is 1 square metre for $10 and 3 square metres for $25.

    (2) A person who engages in conduct that contravenes paragraph (1) (a), (b), (c) or (d) commits an offence.

    Penalty: 20 penalty units.

    (3) An offence mentioned in subregulation (2) is an offence of strict liability.

    Note For strict liability, see section 6.1 of the Criminal Code
    5.6 Exempt utility meters

    For the definition of utility meter in subsection 3 (1) of the Act, the following classes of meters are exempt from the operation of Part IV of the Act:

    (a) gas meters;

    (b) electricity meters installed before 1 January 2013;

    (ba) electricity meters installed on or after 1 January 2013, other than electricity meters that measure less than 750 MWh of energy per year;

    (c) water meters installed before 1 July 2004;

    (d) water meters installed on or after 1 July 2004, other than cold water meters with a maximum continuous flow rate capacity of not more than 4 000 litres per hour.

    Note Meters with a maximum continuous flow rate capacity of not more than 4 000 litres per hour are normally, but not exclusively, used for metering water supplies to domestic premises.

    Division 5 Liquid-measuring systems

    Accuracy classes

    1 Liquid-measuring systems are classified into 5 accuracy classes as set out in table 4.

    Table 4 Liquid-measuring systems — Accuracy classes

    Item
    Accuracy class
    Field of application

    1
    0.3
    Measuring systems on pipeline

    2
    0.5
    All measuring systems if not differently stated elsewhere in this table, in particular:

    (a) fuel dispensers for motor vehicles (except LPG dispensers); and

    (b) measuring systems on road tankers for liquids of low viscosity; and

    (c) measuring systems for the unloading of ships’ tanks and rail and road tankers; and

    (d) measuring systems for milk; and

    (e) measuring systems for loading ships; and

    (f) measuring systems for refuelling aircraft

    Australian Water Holdings has extensive connections with the Liberal Party. In the past five years it has donated at
    least $80,000 to the Coalition, and has used Michael Photios, a member of the NSW Liberal Party’s state executive,
    as a lobbyist.

    Mr Di Girolamo said he had also held meetings with other members of the NSW cabinet, including the
    Water Minister, Greg Pearce, and the Treasurer, Mike Baird.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/icac-seizes-on-australian-waters-link-to-obeid-family-20121216-2bhj2.html#ixzz2H9vHE8HN

  4. Pingback: Whats the difference between water and petrol in NSW ? | peter's space

  5. Pingback: NSW MPs demand answers over NSW Government water deals | peter's space

  6. pamea says:

    Reblogged this on Pamea's Blog and commented:
    Random Choice.. still relevant.

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